Allen College

Course Descriptions


AC | DMS | EdD | MI | MLS | NU | OT | PH | RA

AC 255 Nutrition Fundamentals                                          3 credits

The course is geared toward nursing majors. Study of the needs and functions of food nutrients for growth and maintenance of health throughout the life-cycle. Study of general and specified therapeutic diets for various life-stage, physical and disease states.

AC 265 Nutrition Seminar                                                       1 credit

The course is geared toward nursing majors. Review of methods for identifying and evaluating valid nutrition information and application of nutrition principles in assessing the general nutritional status of patients. Study of selected therapeutic diets in various life-stage, physical and disease states.

AC 306 Professional Communication                                 3 credits

This course provides an overview of strategies that promote interpersonal and professional communication in health care today. Students will practice exploring ideas and conveying information using newly acquired written, technological, oral presentation and/or multimedia presentation skills. 

AC 308: Professional Writing                                                  1 credit

This course is designed to strengthen college-level writing skills. Students will learn and apply academic writing skills, including the use of the APA editorial style manual.
Prerequisite: Must be taken first semester of RN-BSN program

AC 315* Learning and Serving                                                3 credits

This course is intended to combine community service with classroom theory focusing on critical reflection, as well as, personal and civic responsibility. It is designed to facilitate experiential learning through civic engagement by students while emphasizing the College’s mission of service to the community. The course provides unique opportunities to apply academic service-learning through addressing needs in the community.
* A service-learning experience is a component of this course.

AC 316A Service Honors: Diversity & Communication   1 credit

This is one of the courses that is part of the three courses in the service honors program. The focus of this course is to gain exposure to diverse populations and improve abilities to communicate effectively with others. During this course, students will engage in experiential learning using critical reflection as they provide service to the community. Students will complete a minimum of 15 contact hours at community agencies during this course.
Prerequisite: AC 315 and acceptance into service honors program. This course may be taken as partial fulfillment of the nursing elective in the upper division option.

AC 316B Service Honors: Leadership & Group Work     1 credit

This is one of the courses that is part of the three courses in the service honors program. The focus of this course is to build leadership skills and improve the ability to work in groups. During this course, students will engage in experiential learning using critical reflection as they provide service to the community. Students will complete a minimum of 15 contact hours at community agencies during this course.
Prerequisite: AC 315 and acceptance into service honors program. This course may be taken as partial fulfillment of the nursing elective in the upper division option.

AC 316C Service Honors: Service                                            1 credit

This is one of the courses that is part of the three courses in the service honors program. The focus of this course is on service and that impact that service has on communities. During this course, students will engage in experiential learning using critical reflection as they provide service to the community. Students will complete a minimum of 15 contact hours at community agencies during this course.
Prerequisite: AC 315 and acceptance into service honors program. This course may be taken as partial fulfillment of the nursing elective in the upper division option.

DMS 202 Introductory Physics                                               3 credits

Ultrasonic propagation principles, transducers parameters and ultrasound interaction with tissue and biologic effects will be discussed. Hemodynamics and Doppler principles will be introduced.

DMS 203 Abdominal Sonography                                        1 4 credits

Anatomy, physiology and pathology seen on sonograms of the organs in the abdomen will be reviewed. Pertinent laboratory tests, signs and symptoms and ultrasound techniques and protocols will be included.

DMS 207 Ultrasound Imaging I                                             2 credits

This course introduces the student to the ultrasound equipment and prepares the student for hands-on-scanning

DMS 208 Vascular I                                                                     3 credits

This course provides knowledge of vascular anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, hemodynamics, duplex and Doppler imaging techniques relative to the visceral and cerebral vascular systems.

DMS 300 Methods of Patient Care                                      2 credits

This course introduces the student to the fundamental components of patient care including: techniques and procedures used in the field of sonography; medical ethics; professional behavior and responsibility of the sonographer in the clinical setting; infection control and effective communication and cultural diversity.

DMS 301 Advanced Physics                                                    2 credits

This course continues the study of sonographic physics including areas of ultrasonic propagation principles and parameters, transducers and ultrasound interaction with tissue. Basic equipment types, instrumentation, artifacts, quality assurance, hemodynamics and Doppler principles will be reviewed.

DMS 303 Abdominal Sonography II                                     3 credits

Advanced anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the abdomen and superficial structures as related to sonography will be discussed. Laboratory tests, signs and symptoms, ultrasound scanning techniques and protocols will be included.

DMS 304 OB/GYN I                                                                     4 credits

This course reviews gynecological and obstetrical anatomy and physiology and correlates the sonographic evaluation methods and procedures

DMS 305 OB/GYN Sonography II                                          3 credits

This course discusses gynecological and obstetrical anatomy and physiology, correlates sonographic evaluation methods and procedures and discusses the role that sonography plays in evaluating pathophysiology of the reproductive system or the complication of gestation.

DMS 306 Special Studies- Sonography                               3 credits

This course exams the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of specific structures in the human body. Laboratory testing, signs and symptoms and specialized ultrasound techniques and protocols will be reviewed.

DMS 308 Vascular II                                                                   3 credit hours

This course provides knowledge of vascular anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, hemodynamics, direct and indirect ultrasound imaging techniques of the peripheral arteria and venous systems.

DMS 407 Clinical Practicum I                                                10 credits

This course is designed to orientate the student to the functions and responsibilities of a sonographer. Students are introduced to a variety of ultrasound equipment, procedures and basic departmental functions. Students will apply concepts in sonographic procedures, patient care and instrumentation under the supervision of a sonographer in the clinical environment.

DMS 408 Clinical Practicum II                                               12 credits

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their professional growth in clinical areas. This clinical experience applies classroom theory to develop competencies and proficiency. The student will experience more clinical procedures. Students will demonstrate an increasing speed and efficiency in the performance of sonography procedures. Supervised clinical experience.

DMS 409 Clinical Practicum III                                              12 credits

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their professional growth in clinical areas. It is designed to improve the student’s proficiency in procedures presented in previous practicums. The clinical experience presents the student with an opportunity to perform their skills independently and to improve proficiency. Supervised clinical experience.

EdD 700 Organizational Development and Change in Education  3 credits

This course focuses on theories and strategies of organizations that impact the administration and organizational development of schools. Theories, concepts, and the processes for successful change are examined and applied to real situations.

EdD 710 Leading a Health Sciences Learning Organization  3 credits

This course focuses on best practices of leadership in an educational setting. Systems theory, leadership theory, communication theory, organizational dynamics, and organizational best practices provide a framework for study. Accreditation, governance, strategic planning, quality improvement and law as it relates to higher education are concepts included.

EdD 720 Finance and fiscal management                         3 credits

This course focuses on the principles of fiscal resource management and application to the roles of health science educators. Concepts covered include cost analysis, budgeting, contract development, and the financial aspects of program development and evaluation.

EdD 730 Professional, Ethical and Legal Issues and Trends in Health Professions Education                                                                                          3 credits

This course focuses on professional, ethical, and legal issues confronted by educators in the health professions. The course includes discussion and application of the principles that guide ethical decision making. The impact of state and federal laws on educational practices is analyzed. Issues and trends related to privacy, confidentiality, human rights, educational accommodations, due process, and academic integrity are included.

EdD 740 Today’s Health Sciences Student: Trends, Issues and Challenges  3 credits

This course focuses on analyzing current student issues and trends impacting education in the health sciences. The course examines the culture of undergraduate students in nursing and health sciences education and how this culture prepares professionals for the clients they will serve. Focus is given to the changing student clientele and its subgroups and cultures. Student characteristics, attitudes, and values and broad issues regarding their participation in the educational experience are considered

Curriculum and Instruction Courses (15-18 credit hours)

EdD 750 Curriculum Theory and Design in the Health Professions  3 credits

This course focuses on the exploration of evidence based teaching/learning theories and concepts as well as relevant standards and evaluation criteria as they apply to diverse learning environments. Emphasis is placed on development, implementation and evaluation of health professions education courses and curricula.

EdD 760 Pedagogy in Health Professions Education   3 credits

This course examines application of teaching and learning concepts. Philosophy and practices of education and instruction will be emphasized as well as the practical application of the styles and methods of instruction used in the teaching profession.

EdD 770 Assessment and Evaluation in Health Sciences Education  3 credits

This course focuses on issues and practices of evaluation and assessment of educational outcomes, including student learning, curriculum, and program evaluation as well as teacher competency. Testing/assessment methods will be analyzed. Specialty and regional accreditation standards, criteria, and processes will be explored.

EdD 780 Integrating Evolving Technology in Health Professions Education  3 credits

The course is designed to focus on the interaction between technology and pedagogy. Discussion will include use of various technologies in teaching, such as multimedia, internet, digital libraries and textbooks, networks, virtual classrooms and labs, use of simulation, and quality measures for the use of technology in education.

EdD 790 Practicum in Health Professions Education  3-6 credits

This course focuses on the application of educator roles and functions of assessing, planning, intervening, monitoring, and evaluating education in an academic setting. Emphasis is placed on implementing a coordinated, collaborative, technologically appropriate, and integrated approach to health education curriculum, implementation and evaluation. Additionally, the concept of visible learning will be explored and applied to health sciences educational settings.
Prerequisites: EdD 750, EdD 760, or permission of the Director

EdD 795 Practicum in Health Professions Education  3 credits

This course focuses on the application of educator roles and functions of assessing, planning, intervening, monitoring, and evaluating education in an academic setting. Emphasis is placed on implementing a coordinated, collaborative, technologically appropriate, and integrated approach to health education curriculum, implementation and evaluation. Additionally, adult learning theories will be explored and applied to health sciences educational settings.
Prerequisites: EdD 750, EdD 760, or permission of the Director

EdD 800 Evidence Based Practice in the Health Professions  3 credits

This course focuses on evidence based inquiry processes, which provide the student with tools for conducting a major research project. Topics include conceptualizing a research study, designs for research, methodology, data collection and analysis, communicating results and utilizing the findings. A two-day residency in included in this course.

EdD 810 Methods of Inquiry - Qualitative Research   3 credits

This course focuses on educational qualitative research design, data collection, and analysis. Qualitative designs will include but not be limited to ethnography, case study, lived experience, narrative inquire, history, and grounded theory. Issues such as ethics, validity and reliability in relation to qualitative research are addressed.

EdD 820 Methods of Inquiry - Quantitative Research  3 credits

This course focuses on educational quantitative research design, data collection, and analysis. The relationship between research design and selection of statistical analysis and reporting mechanism are included.

EdD 830 Practice Focused Dissertation Seminar          3 credits

This course provides doctoral students with an opportunity to examine and discuss potential topics for a dissertation, as well as exploring the steps in developing a dissertation proposal to include establishing a research question, the literature review, determining methodology, developing the proposal, selecting a dissertation committee and up to and through the oral defense and the final written dissertation. A two-day residency in included in this course.

EdD 840 Practice Focused Dissertation                             9 credits

This course requires the successful completion of an original action research dissertation under the supervision of a dissertation committee of graduate faculty which includes an expert in the topic of the dissertation. Successful students will defend the dissertation orally.
Prerequisites: Candidacy status achieved

EdD 845d Doctoral Project Seminar - Empowering Students  1 credit

In this course, students will work on self-selected projects applicable to doctoral study within a student-driven, facilitated environment. In addition, doctoral-level writing and other tasks necessary for doctoral student success will be covered. Topics covered within the course were created with input from previous students.

EdD 845e Controversies in Health Policy                          3 credits

This course will teach students to use research and data to navigate controversial topics in health. The course will cover long-standing debates (e.g. health reform, firearms) while also addressing current events. Students will also be able to explore their own topics while honing their persuasive writing skills.

EdD 845f Diversity in Education                                          3 credits

This course is designed to address multicultural and diversity issues in higher education. This course will address not only teaching with the increasing diversity on college campuses, but also the preparation of students to function in this environment, and to meet the learning needs of all students. It will function on a four dimensional model of multicultural initiatives.

EdD 845g Evaluating Online Teaching                               3 credits

This course is designed to help those who teach in online environments to effectively measure the quality of online teaching. This course will take a practical approach and provide tools and guidance to help faculty collect information to help improve online teaching and learning.

EdD 845h Literature Review Intensive                               3 credits

This course will revisit topics from EdD 800 Evidence Based Practice in the Health Professions and will provide a condensed approach to selecting and evaluating a potential dissertation topic. This course is designed to provide additional facilitation for students who did not like the topic developed in EdD 800 or for students who want additional support with developing their potential dissertation topic.

EdD 845i Doctoral Project Seminar - Avian Inspiration  1 credit

In this course, students will work on self-selected projects applicable to doctoral study within a student-driven, facilitated environment. In addition, doctoral-level writing and other tasks necessary for doctoral student success will be covered. A writing guide authored by Anne Lamott serves as the inspiration for topics covered within the course.

EdD 845j Doctoral Project Seminar - Academic Writing 1 credit

In this course, students will work on self-selected projects applicable to doctoral study within a student-driven, facilitated environment. In addition, doctoral-level writing and other tasks necessary for doctoral student success will be covered. This section will focus on techniques for improving academic writing.

MI 400 Sectional Anatomy for Medical Imaging           3 credits

This course provides the student with knowledge of relational and sectional anatomy of the head and brain, neck, chest and mediastinum, abdomen, pelvis, and musculoskeletal sections of the body. Anatomical structures are located and identified in axial, coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal (oblique) planes. Anatomical cross-sections of the body are examined utilizing CT and MRI images.

MI 405 Principles of Computed Tomography                  4 credits

This course focuses on the physical and technical principles of computed tomography with an emphasis on the following: physics and instrumentation involved in image production, image quality, postprocessing and image evaluation.

MI 410 Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging      4 credits

This course focuses on the physical principles of magnetic resonance imaging with an emphasis on tissue characteristics, pulse sequencing, imaging parameters, and image formation. The instrumentation used in magnetic resonance imaging is discussed. The fundamentals of MR safety will be discussed.

MI 425 Computed Tomography Protocols                        2 credits

This course provides the student with knowledge of the procedure parameters used in computed tomography. Reconstruction and reformatting of images and the use of contrast media will be discussed. Various adult and pediatric protocols and related indications will be discussed.

MI 430 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocols           2 credits

This course provides the student with knowledge of the tissue characteristics and imaging parameters used in magnetic resonance imaging. Pulse sequences, image formation, and the use of contrast media will also be discussed. Various protocols and related indications will be discussed.

MLS 304 Urinalysis and Body Fluids                                   2 credits

Physical, chemical, and microscopic properties of urine are examined, along with an overview of body fluids.
Prerequisite: Accepted into MLS Program or permission of the instructor.

MLS 413 Clinical Immunology                                                2 credits

Practical aspects of immunology with emphasis on pathological conditions and laboratory practice are presented.
Prerequisite: Accepted into MLS Program or permission of the instructor.

MLS 426 Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine             1 credit

Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine (EBLM) is introduced and compared to other forms of research. Additionally, students cover clinical study design, implementation, and dissemination of results.
Prerequisite: Accepted into MLS Program or permission of the instructor.

MLS 428 Cell Morphology                                                        2 credits

This course covers the skills necessary for performing and interpreting manual differentials. Microscope skills, cell morphology, and maturation sequences are topics included within this course. Students will perform manual differentials using both simulation software and microscopes. Emphasis is placed on interpretation of test results and correlation with patient condition.
Prerequisite: Accepted into MLS Program or permission of the instructor.

MLS 435 General Laboratory Concepts                             2 credits

This course examines all pre-analytical variables in the clinical laboratory setting; including the theory and practice of phlebotomy and specimen processing. The acceptability of a specimen for laboratory testing is included. This course will also incorporate general laboratory concepts including laboratory math, quality control and assurance, instrumentation, safety, and infection control.
Prerequisite: Accepted into MLS Program or permission of the instructor.

MLS 440 Clinical Hematology and Hemostasis              7 credits

This course includes the study of blood cells, bone marrow, and coagulation. Students will learn theory, performance, and interpretation of hematological procedures involving the cellular elements of the blood, and the evaluation of hemostasis. Clinical laboratory experience is provided in a structured clinical environment. Students will gain experience processing and analyzing patient specimens with a wide variety of complex procedures and instruments.
Prerequisite: MLS 428, MLS 435

MLS 445 Clinical Chemistry                                                    7 credits

Clinical Chemistry seeks to understand the physiologic and biochemical processes present in normal and abnormal states and to provide useful information for the diagnosis or treatment of disease through analyses performed on various types of specimens. Included in this course is the study of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, non-protein nitrogen products, electrolytes, blood gases, acid base balance, hormones, tumor markers, therapeutic drugs, and toxicology. Clinical laboratory experience is provided in a structured clinical environment. Students will gain experience processing and analyzing patient specimens with a wide variety of complex procedures and instruments.
Prerequisite: MLS 304, MLS 435

MLS 450 Educational Development 1 credit

Educational methodologies and terminology appropriate for student-centered and training environments are covered in this course. Students will also complete an education-focused Service Learning project.
* Indicates a service-learning component as part of the course.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into MLS Program or permission of the instructor.

MLS 455 Immunohematology                                                7 credits

Blood group systems, antibody screening, compatibility testing, and blood component processing are covered in this course. Clinical experience will allow students to perform antibody identification techniques, complete blood compatibility testing, and observe how components are used to support patients in a clinical environment.
Prerequisite: MLS 413, MLS 435

MLS 460 Clinical Microbiology                                              7 credits

This course involves the study of bacteria in relationship to disease in humans. Topics include clinical signs and symptoms of disease process, specimen collection and processing, modes of transmission and methods of identification. Additionally, fungi and parasites as they relate to disease in humans will be explored. Clinical experience will allow students to process a variety of patient specimens in the microbiology laboratory and gain experience with a wide variety of state-of–the art procedures and equipment for the isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms.
Prerequisite: MLS 435

MLS 465 Clinical Management and Review                     2 credits

The principles of lab administration and management are introduced to the student in this course. Additionally, students will apply concepts covered throughout the MLS curriculum using a case study and review approach. An emphasis will be placed on interpretation of laboratory results and correlation of laboratory results with clinical condition.
Prerequisite: MLS 426, MLS 440, MLS 445, MLS 450

NU 251 Professional Foundations                                        3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the profession of nursing. Emphasis is placed on the history of nursing, educational preparation and roles of the nurse, theoretical perspectives about nursing, and licensure and its implications. Professional communication within the health care profession will be explored. Essential academic skills necessary for nursing students will be addressed.

NU 252 Perspectives of Professional Nursing                 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the profession of nursing. Emphasis is placed on the history of nursing, educational preparation and roles of the nurse, theoretical perspectives about nursing, and licensure and its implications. Professional communication within the health care profession, including the use of APA editorial style, will be explored. Selected concepts related to the health care delivery system, culture, illness, and wellness will be addressed.

NU 270 Introduction to Professional Nursing                  2 credits

This course provides an introduction to the profession of nursing. Emphasis in the course is placed on professional communication and the nurse’s role in health care.

NU 280 Health Assessment                                                      3 credits

This course provides theory and technical skills to prepare the student to conduct comprehensive health assessments. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition, processing and interpretation of data collected from adult clients. Variations throughout the life span and cultural variations will be addressed. Supervised practice time will be provided in the laboratory setting.

NU 290 Pathophysiology                                                          4 credits

This course examines human responses to actual and potential threats to health. Exploration of physiological reactions when the body is confronted by a variety of stressors will be examined at the cellular, systemic, and generalized levels.

NU 299 Transition to Allen  College                                     1 credit

This course provides students with additional resources to be successful in the pre-licensure nursing program. Essential content of the course includes study skills, test-taking strategies, mathematics, science, and English and language usage.

NU 301 Transition to Baccalaureate Nursing                  3 credits

This course is designed for registered nurses seeking a baccalaureate degree in nursing. The major focus of this course is on professional nursing and the challenges confronting baccalaureate nurses in today's world. Discussions utilize a historical perspective to examine current issues. Integration of prior learning and practice experiences are included to facilitate personal development of the registered nurse student in the professional role.
Prerequisite: Must be taken first semester of RN-BSN program

NU 307 Collaboration and Communication in Healthcare  3 credits

This course provides healthcare professionals with the skills necessary to successfully engage in interprofessional collaboration. Students will examine how interprofessional collaborative practice is influenced by various members of the health care team. Students will discuss factors that influence communication styles and how effective communication strategies can be used to facilitate collaborative practice. During this course, students will demonstrate the ability to communicate through an oral presentation as well as through scholarly writing.

NU 320 Pharmacology                                                               3 credits

This course examines various classifications of drugs and the effect of each on the human body. Emphasis is placed on physiological reactions to medications, as well as the appropriate nursing roles in administration, monitoring, evaluation and education of clients and families.
Prerequisite: NU 290

NU 335*Fundamentals of Clinical Nursing                       6 credits**

(3 theory, 1 lab, 2 clinical)
This course provides an introduction to the nursing process and the development and maintenance of the nurse-client relationship. Emphasis is placed on the use of the nursing process in diagnosing and meeting needs of adult clients who do not require a complex degree of nursing interventions using a functional health patterns approach. Opportunities are provided for mastery of technical skills in the laboratory setting and the nursing process in healthcare settings under direct faculty supervision.
Prerequisites: Upper Division option: NU 280 and NU 290; Accelerated option: NU 280; NU 290 may be taken concurrently
* A service-learning experience is a component of this course in the upper division option
**Denotes reduction of 1 credit hour for licensed LPNs and Accelerated BSN

NU 350 Adult Nursing I                                                             4 credits**   

(2 theory, 2 clinical)
This course focuses on the application of the nursing process with adults experiencing interruptions to health. The course examines selected pathophysiologic disorders with a focus on the appropriate nursing interventions and therapeutic modalities needed to achieve optimal levels of wellness. Clinical experiences are in the acute care settings.
Prerequisites: Upper Division option: All 200 level courses; NU 320, & NU 335; Accelerated option: All 200 level courses & NU 335; NU 320 (concurrently)
**Denotes reduction of 1 credit hour for licensed LPNs

NU 360* Mental Health Nursing                                           4 credits**    

(2 theory, 2 clinical)
This course examines the nursing care of clients with ineffective coping skills and mental illness. The etiology and symptomatology of the major mental illnesses will be discussed while focusing on therapeutic communication and relationships. Using the nursing process a variety of nursing interventions and treatment modalities will be studied. Clinical experiences are in a variety of acute care (inpatient) and community based settings.
Prerequisites: Upper Division option: All 200 level courses, NU 320, & NU 335; Accelerated option: All 200 level courses & NU 335; NU 320 (concurrently)
* A service-learning component is a part of the course.
**Denotes reduction of 1 credit hour for licensed LPNs

NU 370 Maternal-Newborn Nursing                                   4 credits**

(2 theory, 2 clinical)
This course utilizes application of the nursing process to families experiencing pregnancy, childbirth, and the transition to parenting. Emphasis is on teaching, health promotion, and application of parent and newborn theoretical and clinical skills in hospital, clinic, home, and community settings. Focus will be on the normal childbearing experience with some exposure to high-risk clients and families.
Prerequisites: All 200 level courses; NU 320, & NU 335
**Denotes reduction of 1 credit hour for licensed LPNs

NU 380 Evidence Based Practice and Nursing Research  3 credits

This course provides an introduction to evidence based nursing practice and research. Students will learn about the quantitative and qualitative research processes. The overall goal of the course is that students are able to read and critically appraise the best evidence available to support nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the components of the research process, including legal and ethical considerations, and the professional nurse’s role in evidence based practice and quality improvement.
Prerequisites: Upper Division option: All 200 level courses, AC 306 & NU 335; Accelerated option: All 200 level courses & NU 335; RN-BSN option: AC 308

NU 390 The Culture of Health Care                                     3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of personal wellness, patient safety, and care of populations with an emphasis on prevention. This course will examine the impact of medical errors, adverse events, and design of appropriate strategies to improve patient safety. Focus will be given to health disparities with an emphasis on improving cultural awareness, cultural sensitivity, and building cultural competency.
Prerequisites: All 200 level courses and NU 335

NU 400* Gerontological Nursing                                           3 credits

(2 theory, 1 clinical)
This course examines the unique needs of the aging client and includes clinical experiences in the community and home settings. Normal physical, psychological, economical, social, and spiritual changes confronting the client and family are explored. The problems and potential opportunities existing in the present system for providing health care for these clients and their caregivers are examined to determine appropriate nursing responsibilities.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses

NU 405 Aging Adult Nursing                                                   3 credits

(2 theory, 1 clinical)
This course applies the knowledge and experiences gained in adult health to the specialized care of older adults. The physical, psychological, societal, legal, ethical, cultural, and financial challenges for the aging population are discussed. Health promotion and illness prevention, while considering the impact of chronic illness, are examined. Knowledge and understanding related to loss, grief, dying and death for clients and families are explored.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses

NU 410* Pediatric Nursing                                                       4 credits**

(2.5 theory, 1.5 clinical)
This course examines nursing and the health care needs of families with children from infancy through adolescence. The course will incorporate health assessment, application of standardized language, and application of the principles of growth and development. Childhood needs, childrearing practices, and parental roles will be examined. Emphasis will be on a family-centered approach to nursing care with application of the nursing process to promote optimal health for the child and the family. Clinical experiences will be in acute, chronic, community, and well-child settings.
Prerequisites: All 200 level courses; NU 320, and NU 350
* A service-learning component is a part of the course
**Denotes reduction of 1 credit hour for licensed LPNs

NU 415 Overview of U.S Health Care                                 3 credits

This course will provide an overview of the United States health care system including its history, structure, funding, and future. Various stakeholders of the health care system will be discussed in relation to their role in health care delivery. Attention will be given to the understanding of the basic principles related to health care finance and economics. The implications of politics and policy on the health care system will be described. The role of values and ethics in health care decisions will be explored. The health care system of the United States will be compared to other countries.
Prerequisites: Completion of two 300 level clinical courses

NU 420 Professional Issues & Trends                                 3 credits

This course focuses on the identification, exploration and analysis of selected contemporary issues in nursing and healthcare. Significant historical, social, political, legal and ethical factors will be examined to determine the development of the nursing discipline. Contemporary and emerging roles of the nurse will be analyzed to identify the present status and future of professionalism in nursing.
Prerequisites: Completion of two 300 level clinical courses and NU 380

NU 421 Health Policy, Law, and Ethics                               3 credits

The purpose of this course is to examine the foundations of healthcare policy and the regulatory environments that impact nursing practice and client care. This course is designed to provide students with the practical knowledge to address basic legal and ethical issues that impact healthcare and professional nursing practice.

NU 425 Health Care in the United States                         3 credits

This course will provide an overview of the United States health care system including its history, structure, funding, and future. Various stakeholders of the health care system will be discussed in relation to their role in health care delivery. Attention will be given to the understanding of the basic principles related to health care finance and economics. The implications of politics and policy on the health care system will be described. The role of values and ethics in health care decisions will be explored. Discussion of the health care disparities among diverse populations will occur. The health care system of the United States will be compared to other countries.
Prerequisites: Completion of two 300 level clinical courses

NU 430 Grief, Loss and End of Life Nursing Care          3 credits

This course examines aspects of care related to loss, grief, dying and death for clients and families across the lifespan. Emphasis is on understanding personal, professional and societal attitudes and in analyzing ethical/legal issues toward death and dying. The course focuses on the biopsychosocial, spiritual, cultural and intellectual needs of the client and family in providing quality nursing care for bereavement and at the end of life.
Prerequisites: All 200 level courses and NU 335

NU 445 Nursing Elective                                                           3 credits

Specific topics relevant to nursing practice are examined to provide an in-depth approach and a broad base for further study. Exploration of expanded roles of the nurse is included. Course offerings may include: Image of Nursing, Service-Learning Among Vulnerable Populations, and Perioperative Nursing.
Prerequisites: vary based on specific course.

NU 447B Nursing Informatics                                                3 credits

This course examines and explores the impact of computer technology and nursing informatics on the profession of nursing. Students will be challenged and encouraged to analyze their current role (as a registered nurse, student nurse or student nurse tech) and how this role is affected by technology.
Note: This course may be taken in the upper division option to fulfill the nursing elective requirement.

NU 450* Community and Public Health Nursing  4 credits (2 theory, 2 clinical)

3 credits (2 theory, 1 clinical) RN-BSN

This course applies the nursing process in community and public health environments with the community as client. The focus is on public health principles, community assessment, health planning, health education, health promotion, risk reduction/disease prevention, and major public health concerns. Cultural competence when working with vulnerable populations is another aspect of this course. Clinical experiences focus on caring for population health in community agencies, public health departments, schools, industries, correctional settings, and health centers.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses.
* A service-learning experience is a component of this course.

NU 457 Nursing Management of Chronic Illness           4 credits 

(3 theory, 1 clinical)
This course examines the concepts of chronic illness and disability and the various care delivery systems used to meet the needs of this population including palliative, home, and long term care; hospice, rehabilitation, and case management. Through the clinical component of this course, students are exposed to caring for clients with chronic illness and disability in these settings. This course will also examine the professional, societal, legal, ethical, cultural, and financial considerations of care provision for this population. Students will complete selected End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) modules as a component of this course.

NU 460 Nursing Leadership & Management                   3 credits

This course analyzes the leadership and management roles of the nurse in the health care delivery system. Leadership styles, management processes, organizational structures, and evaluation of outcomes on professional nursing practice are examined.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses

NU 461 Nursing Leadership                                                    4 credits 

(3 theory, 1 clinical)
This course analyzes the leadership and management roles of the nurse in the health care delivery system. Leadership styles, management processes, organizational structures, and evaluation of outcome on professional nursing practice are examined.

NU 470 Adult Nursing II                                                           4 credits 

(2 theory, 2 clinical)
This course allows students to apply the nursing process with clients and families experiencing interruptions to health, which require increasingly complex nursing interventions. Opportunities to refine nursing interventions and manage clients with complex, multi-system needs are provided. Collaboration with other health team members is emphasized.
Prerequisites: All 200 level courses; NU 320 and NU 350

NU 480 Nursing Internship                                                     4 credits

(1 theory, 3 clinical)
This course provides further development in organizing, setting priorities, application and synthesis of nursing theory to practice, and delegation of tasks. An intensive clinical experience provides the development of skills in the following areas: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, informatics, safety, quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and professionalism.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses; NU 410 & NU 470

NU 485 Adult Nursing II                                                           2 credits

This course allows students to apply the nursing process with clients and families experiencing interruptions to health, which require increasingly complex nursing interventions. Opportunities to refine nursing interventions and manage clients with complex, multi-system needs are provided. Collaboration with other health team members is emphasized.
Prerequisites: All 200 level courses; NU 320 &  NU 350

NU 486 Nursing Internship                                                    4 credits

An intensive clinical experience provides for the development of skills in the following areas: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, informatics, safety, quality improvement, evidence-based care, and professionalism.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses; NU 410 & NU 485

NU 491 Role Transition                                                           3 credits

This course emphasizes professional socialization and assists students to transition to the role of the registered nurse. It provides further development in organizing, setting priorities, application and synthesis of nursing theory to practice, and delegation of tasks. Students are provided with a variety of resources to assist with preparing them for the NCLEX-RN examination.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses and NU 470; must be taken the semester of graduation

NU 491C Role Transition: Internship                                 3 credits

An intensive clinical experience provides the development of skills in the following areas: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, informatics, safety, quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and professionalism.
Prerequisites: All 300 level courses, NU 410, & NU 470

NU 492 Transition into Professional Nursing: Internship  6 credits

(2 theory, 4 clinical)
This course emphasizes professional socialization and assists students to transition to the role of the registered nurse. An intensive clinical experience provides for the development of skills in the following areas: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, informatics, safety, quality improvement, evidence-based care, and professionalism. (Students are provided with a variety of resources to assist with preparing them for the NCLEX-RN examination.
Prerequisites: Must be taken during the semester of graduation

NU 495 Independent Study                                            1 to 4 credits

Guided study of an area of special interest to the student.

NU 495C Professional Practice: Clinical Experience  1 to 3 credits

This course provides additional clinical experience in a variety of nursing settings under the direct supervision of a qualified preceptor. Seminars will be used to facilitate discussion related to clinical issues and clinical practice.
Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in the clinical setting where this experience will occur.

NU 497 Application of Evidence-based Practice           3 credits

This course applies the key elements of evidence-based practice. In collaboration with a practice partner, the student will identify a clinical question. The student will then search and appraise the literature for potential solutions, describe a plan that can be implemented to address the clinical question, and evaluate the potential outcomes of a practice change. Processes for leading and managing practice changes as well as improving patient, population, and organizational outcomes will be explored. Resources inherent to solving clinical problems including clinical decision-making skills, inter-professional perspectives, and patient preferences will be discussed.
Prerequisites: NU 380; NU 461 concurrently

NU 499 Role Transition                                                             2 credits

This course emphasizes professional socialization and assists students to transition to the role of the registered nurse. Students are provided with a variety of resources to assist with preparing them for the NCLEX-RN examination. This course provides an opportunity for the student to experience an online computer-assisted, standardized comprehensive exam similar to the NCLEX-RN.
Prerequisites: Must be taken semester of graduation.

NU 505 Leadership for Advanced Nursing                        3 credits

This course examines strategies to initiate and maintain effective working relationships using mutually respectful communication and collaboration within interprofessional teams, demonstrating skills in care coordination, delegation, and initiation of conflict resolution strategies. Methods, tools, performance measures, culture of safety principles, and standards related to quality are analyzed. Theories and principles related to leadership, ethics, and change are applied.

NU 520 Policy, Organization & Financing of Health Care  3 credits

This course is divided into three interactive parts: policy, organization, and finance. In the health care policy section, students will become familiar with public, governmental, and third party participation in health care. Students will develop a comprehensive knowledge of how health policy is formulated, how to affect this process, and how it impacts clinical practice and health care delivery. In the health care organization section, students will become familiar with the organization of community-based and acute-based systems of care. In the financing section, students will become familiar with health care financing as a foundation for the delivery of health care services. Students will also gain an appreciation for the global nature of health care delivery. The goal of this course is to provide a foundation for the graduate to provide quality cost-effective care, participate in the design and implementation of care in a variety of health care systems, and assume a leadership role in the management of health care resources.

NU 530 Population Health                                                      3 credits

Population Health facilitates the development of a strong theoretical foundation in health promotion, illness prevention, and maintenance of function across the health–illness continuum with individual clients, groups and communities. An understanding of health care practices and health deviations across racial, cultural, ethnic, gender, age groups, and family structures will be examined. The World Health Organization health goals and the national health goals are used as a guiding framework for discussion of the personal/clinical and community-based interventions that can be implemented by the advanced practice nurse. Students are encouraged to assume leadership roles in the community setting in the application of social policies that influence the goals of achieving health.

NU 535 Evidence-Based Practice I: Finding and Appraising Evidence  3 credits

This course is designed to prepare graduate nurses with skills necessary to find, appraise, and synthesize research and other evidence which are foundational to the translation of evidence into practice. Problem-based activities will assist the student to use databases effectively, understand evidence-based practice appraisal frameworks for the critique of sources, and ultimately to synthesize the literature relevant to an identified practice problem.
Pre- or Co-requisite: NU596

NU 536 Evidence Based Practice II: Applying Evidence for Practice Change  3 credits

The goal of this course is to prepare students to ethically translate current evidence into practice. The course is focused on applying research outcomes within the practice setting to resolve practice problems, which is known as implementation or improvement science. The process of implementing evidence based practice includes identifying questions needing answers, searching the evidence for potential solutions/innovations, implementing appropriate evidence based solutions, and evaluating the outcomes. The course introduces concepts and processes to prepare the student to take a leadership role to improve care decisions and to serve as a role model and mentor for evidence-based decision making. At the end of the course, students will be prepared to disseminate a proposal for an evidence-based practice change to constituencies of interest.
Prerequisite: NU535

NU 540 Evidence Based Practice                                          3 credits

The goal of this course is to prepare students to ethically translate current evidence into practice. The course is focused on applying research outcomes within the practice setting to resolve practice problems, which is known as implementation or improvement science. The process of implementing evidence based practice includes identifying questions needing answers, searching the evidence for potential solutions/innovations, implementing appropriate evidence based solutions, and evaluating the outcomes. The course introduces concepts and processes to prepare the student to take a leadership role to improve care decisions and to serve as a role model and mentor for evidence-based decision making.
Pre- or Co-Requisite: NU596

NU 541 Health Care Informatics                                          3 credits

In this course, students will analyze nursing informatics principles and technologies which are used to deliver and enhance patient care. As knowledge workers who are information dependent, nurses must be well prepared to make significant contributions in their area of nursing expertise by capturing and implementing appropriate and timely information. Students will gain an understanding of how informatics is used in administration, education, research, and, most specifically, at the point of care. Ethical challenges and regulatory requirements related to protected health information will be presented. The Foundation of Knowledge Model will be used as an organizing conceptual framework in analyzing acquisition, dissemination, generation, and processing of nursing knowledge that is central and vital to the practice of nursing.

NU542C Clinical Enrichment: Informatics                       1-2 credits

Advanced practice theoretical and experiential learning throughout the Leadership in Health Informatics Technology program are integrated in clinical experiences. Current informatics issues are examined and reviewed through application in clinical settings. Clinical opportunities will be provided to integrate the advanced practice role of nurse informaticist. A clinical experience with a preceptor will provide the student an opportunity to examine informatics as demonstrated in a healthcare setting.

NU 550 Advanced Health Assessment        3 credits 75 clinical hrs

This course is a framework for systematic and holistic health assessment of children, adults and older adults. Students build on basic assessment skills by learning advanced techniques and diagnostics to apply in the laboratory and clinical settings. Students differentiate actual and potential health problems using assessment data and relevant diagnostic findings. This course focuses on health assessment and common problems of persons from newborn through elderly in rural and urban settings. Teaching strategies include lecture, discussion, case studies, role-planning, laboratory, and clinical practice settings.

NU 560 Advanced Physiology & Disease States             3 credits

This course focuses on normal and disturbed human function at cellular, organ, and system levels. The effects of disease on generalized functional integrity are analyzed across the life span. Normal physiology and pathophysiology are discussed including assessment and differential diagnostic methodologies, as a basis for advanced nursing practice.

NU 570 Advanced Pharmacology                                        3 credits

This course explores the clinical applications of pharmacological agents (prescription and over the counter) commonly used in primary care settings for individuals of varying ages and cultural backgrounds. The pharmacological/therapeutic categories of drugs are reviewed; selected drugs within categories are compared and contrasted with respect to indications, efficacy, adverse effects, monitoring parameters, administration, common drug-drug interactions, and cost. Emphasis is placed on prescriptive authority for nurse practitioners.

NU 581 Psychopharmacology and Neuropathophysiology  4 credits

This course is designed to provide advanced practice nursing students with knowledge of essential neuropathophysiology and psychopharmcotherapeutics of common mental illnesses across the lifespan. Course content includes neural structure and function thought to be implicated in symptom presentation and disease progression of select serious mental illnesses. In addition, medications used for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of psychological and psychiatric disorders and monitoring the physiological, psychiatric, and behavioral responses to these interventions will be covered.

NU 596 Graduate Seminar                                                      1 credit

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to graduate-level study. All of the proposed content will help prepare the student for the academic writing and presentation requirements in future graduate courses. Specifically, this course covers (a) the basics of evidence-based practice including identification of practice problems in nursing and the types of evidence for addressing those problems, (b) academic writing and American Psychological Association (APA) editorial style, (c) literature research and appropriate use of literature in academic writing, (d) avoiding plagiarism, and (e) preparation of slide presentations. This course is required in the first semester of enrollment in graduate study. RN-MSN students will not take this course until the BSN requirements are completed and they are fully enrolled in MSN study.

NU 600 Family Nursing: Adult & Older Adult                 3 credits

This course is designed to educate the primary care nurse practitioner in the care of the adult and older adult clients in a variety of health care settings. Emphasis is placed upon the appropriate history, physical assessment, and diagnostic testing and treatment required in relationship to health problems. Students are taught how to formulate differential diagnoses and select and interpret diagnostic testing. Appropriate pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are explored in relationship to the diagnosis, age and lifestyle of the patient, and accepted standards of care. Students are educated regarding the appropriateness of medical consultation, referral and follow-up.
Prerequisites: NU550, NU560 and NU570

NU 600C Family Nursing I          2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the Family Nurse Practitioner the opportunity to actively care for adults and older adults in a variety of selected settings with different availability of health care resources. Under the guidance and supervision of an approved preceptor the student will assess, diagnose, and treat health care conditions, as well as evaluate the patient’s response to the care plan. During this experience the student will interact with patients/significant others in the construction of a plan of care and the promotion of health. The student will be able to enact the role of the Nurse Practitioner in a health care setting with other health care providers.
Prerequisites: NU550, NU560, NU570
Co-Requisite: NU600

NU 605 Primary Care of Women and Children              3 credits

This course focuses on family nursing issues related to management of health needs of women, adolescents and children. Emphasis is on growth and development, health promotion/ protection, and management of common illnesses in these special populations. Appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are explored in relationship to the diagnosis, age, culture, and lifestyle of the patient and current evidence based practice. Students are educated regarding the appropriateness of medical consultation, referral and follow-up.
Prerequisites: NU600/NU600C, and either ACLS certification OR completion of NetLearning EKG Module

NU 605C Family Nursing II                         2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the Family Nurse Practitioner the opportunity to actively care for patients across the age continuum. The emphasis this semester is on pediatric and women’s health issues in a variety of settings. While any family practice setting is appropriate, it is expected that a portion of the clinical experience will include addressing health issues in children and women among cases seen. Clinical specialty sites may be used for portions of the practicum as long as these are applicable to family practice. Under the guidance and supervision of an approved preceptor the student will assess, diagnose, and treat health care conditions, as well as evaluate the patient’s response to the care plan. During this experience the student will interact with patients/significant others in the construction of a plan of care and the promotion of health. The student will be able to enact the role of the Nurse Practitioner in a health care setting with other health care providers.
Prerequisites: NU600/NU600C
Co-Requisite: NU605

NU 610 Complex Care of the Family                                   3 credits

This content focuses on the care of the patient with complex medical problems or comorbidities as well as care of patients with complex family or environmental situations. Attention is on long-term management of less common medical conditions, chronic illnesses, and social/ethical issues with emphasis on engaging family and community support and understanding the needs of special populations and disabilities.
Prerequisites: NU600/NU600C, NU605/NU605C

NU 610C Family Nursing III                          2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the Family Nurse Practitioner the opportunity to actively care for patients across the age continuum. The emphasis this semester is on complex health issues affecting patients and families from infants to geriatrics. Clinical specialty sites may be used for portions of the practicum as long as these are applicable to family practice. Under the guidance and supervision of an approved preceptor the student will assess, diagnose, and treat health care conditions, as well as evaluate the patient’s response to the care plan. During this experience the student will interact with patients/significant others in the construction of a plan of care and the promotion of health. The student will be able to enact the role of the Nurse Practitioner in a health care setting with other health care providers.
Prerequisites: NU605/NU605C
Co-Requisite: NU610

NU 612C Clinical Enrichment                        1 credit 75 clinical hrs

In this clinical course, the student has the opportunity to choose the area(s) of nursing practice for further experience related to their Nurse Practitioner track. Each student must complete 75 hours of clinical during the semester.
Prerequisites: NU600/NU600C, NU670/NU670C, or NU 615/NU 615C.

NU 615 Foundations for the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner  3 credits

This course focuses on the role of the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner in health promotion, assessment, diagnosis and management of common mental illness across the lifespan. Research and theory are used to identify strategies that are integral to advanced nursing practice for the promotion of health and prevention of illness. Students use critical thinking processes to make differential diagnoses and to plan and implement therapeutic regimens, including psychopharmacology. The course emphasizes collaboration among the individual, family, other health care disciplines, and the community to prevent and treat mental illness. Research findings and practice standards guide holistic care, psychopharmacology, and therapy across the lifespan as individuals, families, and groups. The client’s sociocultural background, development level, and treatment setting are considered in management. Hybrid course offering.
Prerequisites: NU581, NU550, NU560, and NU570

NU 615C Clinical Foundations for the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner I   2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course prepares individuals for advanced psychiatric-mental health nursing practice by integrating theoretical, clinical, and research knowledge in acute and primary mental health care settings. Emphasizes application of integrated knowledge related to theories, and therapeutic techniques for individuals, families, and groups under the supervision of expert faculty and mental health professionals in individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and the use of psychopharmacology.
Pre- or Co-Requisites: NU581, NU550, NU560, NU570
Co-Requisite: NU615

NU 620 Foundations for the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner II  2 credits

This course is a continuation of NU: 615 and emphasizes health promotion, diagnosis, and management of common illnesses in psychiatric practice across the lifespan. Research and theory used to identify strategies that are integral to advanced nursing practice for promotion of health and prevention of illness. Students use critical thinking processes to make differential diagnoses and to plan and implement therapeutic regimens including psychopharmacology. The course emphasizes collaboration among patient, family, other health care disciplines and the community to prevent and treat mental illness. Research findings and practice standards guide holistic care, psychopharmacology and therapy with children, adolescents, adult, and older adults as individuals in families or groups. Client’s sociocultural background and development level and treatment setting are considered in management. (Hybrid course offering)
Prerequisites: NU615 and NU615C

NU 620C Clinical Foundations for the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner II  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is a continuation of NU: 615 and 615C. Students continue their preparation for advanced psychiatric-mental health nursing practice by integrating theoretical, clinical, and research knowledge in acute and primary mental health care settings. Emphasizes application of integrated knowledge related to theories and therapeutic techniques for individuals, families, and groups under the supervision of expert faculty and mental health clinicians. Interventions include assessment, crisis intervention, case management, brief therapy, individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and the use of psychopharmacology.
Prerequisites: NU615 and NU615C
Co-Requisite: NU620

NU 625 Foundations for the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner III  2 credits

This course is a continuation of NU: 615 and NU:620 and emphasizes health promotion, diagnosis, and management of common illnesses in psychiatric practice across the lifespan. Research and theory used to identify strategies that are integral to advanced nursing practice for promotion of health and prevention of illness. Students use critical thinking processes to make differential diagnoses and to plan and implement therapeutic regimens including psychopharmacology in the complex patient. The course emphasizes collaboration among patient, family, other health care disciplines and the community to prevent and treat mental illness. Research findings and practice standards guide holistic care, psychopharmacology and therapy with children, adolescents, adult, and older adults as individuals in families or groups. Client’s sociocultural background and development level and treatment setting are considered in management. The course will also emphasize advanced practice legal and ethical issues.
(Offered through hybrid and face to face meetings)
Prerequisites: NU620/NU620C

NU 625C Clinical Foundations for the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner III  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

Students continue their preparation for advanced psychiatric-mental health nursing practice by integrating theoretical, clinical, and research knowledge in acute and primary mental health care settings. Students prepare for the advanced practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing by planning and implementing mental health interventions across the lifespan in a variety of settings. Students are supervised by faculty and expert clinicians primarily in community settings where resources are considered in the delivery of care.
Prerequisites: NU620/NU620C
Pre- or Co-Requisite: NU625

NU 626 Management & Care of Children and Adolescents with Acute and Chronic Mental Health Conditions for the Certified APMHNP  3 credits

This course focuses on health promotion, diagnosis, and management of common illnesses in psychiatric practice with children and adolescents. It is an elective course for those individuals who currently are certified as Adult Advanced Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners. Research and theory are used to identify strategies that are integral to advanced nursing practice for promotion of health and prevention of illness. Students use critical thinking processes to make differential diagnoses and to plan and implement therapeutic regimens including psychopharmacology. The course emphasizes collaboration among patient, family, other health care disciplines and the community to prevent and treat mental illness. Research findings and practice standards guide holistic care, psychopharmacology and therapy with children and adolescents as individuals in families or groups. Client’s sociocultural background and development level and treatment setting are considered in management. A post master’s certificate in family mental health and psychiatric nurse practitioner will be awarded with successful completion of this course as well as completion of NU:626C Management and Care of Children and Adolescents, with Acute and Chronic Mental Health Conditions for the certified AMHNP: Practicum
Prerequisites: Current certification as an Adult Advanced Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

NU 626C Management & Care of Children and Adolescents with Acute and Chronic Mental Health Conditions for the Certified APMHNP: Practicum  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course focuses on health promotion, diagnosis, and management of common illnesses in psychiatric practice with children and adolescents in the clinical setting. It is an elective course for those individuals who currently are certified as Adult Advanced Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners. Students continue their preparation for family advanced psychiatric-mental health nursing practice by integrating theoretical, clinical, and research knowledge in acute and primary mental health care settings for the child and adolescent. Students are supervised by faculty and expert clinicians primarily in community settings where resources are considered in the delivery of care.
Prerequisites: Current certification as an Adult Advanced Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

NU 630 Curriculum Theory & Design                                 3 credits

This course is focused on curriculum theory and design, teaching and learning theory, the faculty role in teaching and learning, working with multicultural students and students with disabilities, an managing academic performance issues, student integrity, and incivility issues.
Prerequisites: None

NU 635 Curriculum Development & Implementation  3 credits

This course is focused on course development; teaching/learning strategies in classroom, lab, and clinical settings; providing constructive and substantive feedback; an introduction to writing rubrics and objectives; and ethical and legal issues. Students will have the opportunity to engage in thoughtful self-evaluation and substantive, constructive feedback to classmates.
Prerequisite: NU630

NU 635C Education Clinical I                           2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This education clinical course is designed to provide an application experience in nursing education in association with NU 635 Curriculum Development and Implementation. Each student will work with qualified nurse educator preceptors to develop and deliver course content, implement various teaching/learning strategies, and engage in other activities associated with the faculty role (e.g., attend committee meetings, etc.). Students will also work with qualified clinical practice preceptors to engage in clinical experience that is designed to develop in-depth knowledge and expertise in a particular area of nursing that includes graduate-level clinical practice content and experiences, and that enhances their own clinical experience.
Prerequisites: NU550, NU560, NU570
Co-Requisite: NU635

NU 640 Educational Evaluation                                            3 credits

This course is focused on multiple types of evaluation that are commonly used in nursing education. Educational evaluation and change in relation to educational outcomes and course evaluations will be discussed. The student will learn effective test design, test writing skills, and methods of evaluating test scores. Evaluation tools and accreditation will be discussed. Students will also learn to develop effective rubrics and measurable objectives, and will learn to apply these tools in the evaluative process. Student advising and student evaluations will be addressed.
Prerequisites: NU635/NU635C
Co-Requisite: NU640

NU 640C Education Clinical II               2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This clinical course is designed to provide a clinical experience in association with NU 640 Educational Evaluation. Each student will work with a preceptor in nursing education. Students will continue their experiences in nursing education (started in NU 635C). Additionally, they will seek opportunities to engage in various evaluation processes as presented in the NU 640 didactice course objectives. Students will seek opportunities to provide advising, counseling, and evaluation to individual undergraduate nursing students in a supervised setting.
Prerequisites: NU635/NU635C.
Co-Requisite: NU640

NU 645 Community/Public Health I: Foundations       2 credits

This course is designed to educate the graduate nurse in the care of aggregate populations. Historical perspectives of public health as well as contemporary community health problems are addressed. Students complete an assessment of a larger community or city and in doing so identify health, social environmental, economic, and policy concerns within that community. Conceptual models from community health nursing as well as health promotion and disease prevention concepts are analyzed as they relate to assessing the health of a community.

NU 645C Community/Public Health I Clinical  1 credit 75 clinical hrs

Application of principles learned in NU645 to the clinical setting. Focus will be placed upon health promotion and disease prevention.
Pre or Co-Requisite: NU 645

NU 646 Advanced Community/Public Health  3 credits 75 clinical hrs

This course extends the knowledge and skills learned in Community/Public Health I course. Health disparities and high risk populations are discussed as well as community health programming to reduce risk among these aggregates. Community development theory, community health planning and implementation, and public health policy are analyzed as the student develops, implements, and evaluates a community intervention for a specific high-risk population.
Prerequisites: NU: 645 and NU: 645C

NU 646C Community/Public Health II Clinical   1 credit 75 clinical hrs

Application of principles learned in NU646 to the clinical setting. Focus will be placed upon high risk populations and those with specific health disparities.
Pre- or Co-requisite: NU646

NU 647C Community Health Enrichment  1 credit 75 clinical hrs

Advanced practice theoretical and experiential learning throughout the community health program are integrated in clinical experiences. A precepted clinical opportunity will be provided to integrate the advanced practice role of the community health nurse and provide the graduate student an opportunity to examine community health theory as demonstrated in a community health/public health setting.
Prerequisites: NU645 and NU 645C

NU 651 Leadership I: Role/Organization Theory/Change  2 credits

The purpose of this course is to guide the MSN student in learning to manage and lead individuals and groups within health service organizations. Components of effective leadership will be examined. Students will be guided in a self-assessment of personal values and leadership style. The course includes a comprehensive analysis of leadership theories, principles of management and organizational behavior. Content also includes discussion of change, decision-making, motivation and team building, interpersonal group behavior, and communication

NU 651C Leadership I Clinical  1 credit 75 clinical hrs

The purpose of this course is to guide the MSN student in learning to manage and lead individuals and groups within health service organizations. Components of effective leadership will be examined. Students will be guided in a self-assessment of personal values and leadership style. This clinical course complements a comprehensive analysis of leadership theories, principles of management and organizational behavior. Content also includes discussion of change, decision- making, motivation and team building, interpersonal group behavior, and communication. Clinical opportunities will be provided to integrate the advanced practice role of leader/manager. A clinical practicum experience will provide the student an opportunity to examine related course concepts.
Pre or Co-Requisite: NU 651

NU 652 Leadership II: Health Care Organizations/Legal/Ethical  2 credits

This course discusses significant developments within the US healthcare system, effect of global influences, and implications to the future of healthcare delivery. Ethical and legal principles, theories, and implications are also addressed.

NU 652C Leadership II Clinical  1 credit 75 clinical hrs

Clinical opportunities will be provided to integrate the advanced practice role of leader/manager. A clinical practicum experience will provide the student an opportunity to examine concepts related to legal and ethical issues in a health care organization.
Pre or Co-Requisite: NU 652

NU 653 Leadership III: Quality/Safety/Regulatory      2 credits

This course discusses issues related to quality, safety and regulation of health care organizations. Advanced practice leaders and managers must be responsible and accountable for promoting and supporting initiatives that provide safe experiences for patients and families.

NU 653C Leadership III Clinical                1 credit 75 clinical hrs

Advanced practice leaders and managers must be responsible and accountable for promoting and supporting initiatives that provide safe experiences for patients and families. Clinical opportunities will be provided to integrate the advanced practice role of leader/manager. A clinical practicum experience will provide the student an opportunity to examine concepts related quality and safety issues in a health care organization.
Pre-or Co-Requisite: NU 653

NU 654C Leadership Enrichment            1 credit 75 clinical hrs

Advanced practice theoretical and experiential learning throughout the leadership program are integrated in clinical experiences. Current leadership and management issues are examine and reviewed through application in clinical settings. Clinical opportunities will be provided to integrate the advanced practice role of leader/manager. A clinical experience with a preceptor will provide the student an opportunity to examine leadership theory as demonstrated in a healthcare setting.

NU 667 Human Resources for the Health Care Mgr    3 credits

This course is designed to acquaint the MSN student with basic legal and organizational human resource issues often encountered in a health care organization. Focus will be on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. Topics that will be covered in this course include: interviewing, hiring, compliance, labor relations, wage and hour regulations, compensation, performance development and reviews, issues of discrimination and harassment in the work environment, and staff training and workforce improvement initiatives.

NU 664 Health Care Economics and Financial Mgmnt  3 credits

This course is designed to provide the knowledge necessary for graduates to provide quality cost-effective care and to successfully manage human, fiscal, and physical healthcare resources. Business principles, economies of care, and analyzing the impact of systems on patient outcomes will be presented.

NU 670 Adult-Gerontology: Acute Care I Diagnostics & Intervention  3 credits

This course is designed to educate the Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner in the roles and responsibilities of the AGACNP, health promotion, documentation, and protocols for hospital admission for acute care patients. Care of the critically ill adult client experiencing episodic illness, exacerbation of chronic illness, or terminal illness of the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, and eye, ear, nose, and throat (EENT) systems will also be addressed. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and critical analysis of clinical interventions relevant to the management of the care of client who has life-threatening illnesses or injuries of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and EENT systems.
Prerequisites: NU550, NU560 and NU570

NU 670C Adult-Gerontology: Acute Care I Diagnostics & Intervention – Practicum  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner the opportunity to actively care for the acutely ill adult client through all phases of hospitalization and clinic care. Under the supervision and guidance of an approved preceptor the student will assess, diagnose, and treat acute and chronic conditions, as well as evaluate the client’s response to the plan of care.
Prerequisites: NU550, NU560 and NU570;
Co or Prerequisite: NU670

NU 675 Adult-Gerontology: Acute Care II Diagnostics & Intervention  3 credits

This course is designed to educate the Adult –Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner in the care of the acutely ill adult client experiencing episodic illness, exacerbation of chronic illness, or terminal illness of the hematological, oncological, musculoskeletal, neurological, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, renal, and dermatological systems. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and critical analysis of clinical interventions relevant to the management of the care of client who has life-threatening illnesses or injury of these systems.
Prerequisites: NU670/NU670C

NU 675C Adult-Gerontology: Acute Care II Diagnostics & Intervention: Practicum  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner the opportunity to actively care for the hospitalized acutely ill adult client experiencing medical and/or surgical alterations. Under the supervision and guidance of an approved preceptor the student will assess, diagnose, and treat acute conditions, as well as evaluate the client’s response to the plan of care.
Prerequisites: NU670/NU670C;
Co-requisite: NU675

NU 680 Adult-Gerontology: Acute Care III Diagnostics & Intervention  3 credits

This course is designed to educate the Adult- Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner in the care of acutely ill patients among special populations, including those who are terminally ill. Cultural aspects of care for the acutely ill patient will be examined. Additionally, care of the critically ill adult client experiencing episodic illness, exacerbation of chronic illness, or terminal illness of the endocrine system will be addressed. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and critical analysis of clinical interventions relevant to the management of clients who require emergency or intensive care.
Prerequisites: NU675/NU675C

NU 680C Adult-Gerontology: Acute Care III Diagnostics & Intervention: Practicum  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner the opportunity to actively care for the hospitalized critically ill or injured adult client through experiencing medical and/or surgical alterations. Under the supervision and guidance of an approved preceptor the student will assess, diagnose, and treat acute and chronic conditions, as well as evaluate the client’s response to the plan of care.
Prerequisites: NU675/NU675C
Co-requisite: NU680

NU 685 Adult-Gerontology: Primary Care Nursing II   3 credits

This course is designed to provide an expansion of the approaches to managing problems of adult and gerontology clients in a variety of settings. Use of clinical decision making will be explored to assist the student in the determination of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to enhance functional activity and reduce unintentional illness or injury. Use of age appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutics will continue to be explored in relationship to the diagnosis, age, and life-style of the patient, and accepted standards of care.
Prerequisites: NU600/NU600C

NU 685C Adult-Gerontology: Primary Care Nursing II Practicum  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the adult/gerontological nurse practitioner student the opportunity to apply primary care management to the care of aging adults in a variety of selected settings. Under the guidance and supervision of an approved preceptor emphasis will be placed on health promotion, risk reduction, and restorative intervention in addressing health behaviors throughout adulthood and aging.
Prerequisites: NU600/NU600C
Co-requisite: NU685

NU 690 Adult-Gerontology: Primary Care Nursing III  3 credits

This course is designed to provide an expansion of the approaches to managing problems of adult and gerontology clients in a variety of settings. Use of clinical decision making will be explored to assist the student in determination of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to enhance functional activity and reduce unintentional illness or injury. Use of age appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutics will continue to be explored in relationship to the diagnosis, age, and lifestyle of the patient.
Prerequisites: NU685/NU685C

NU 690C Adult-Gerontology: Primary Care Nursing III Practicum  2 credits 150 clinical hrs

This course is designed to provide the adult gerontological prmary care nurse practitioner student the opportunity to actively care for adults and older adults in a variety of settings with different availability of health care resources. Under the guidance and supervision of an approved preceptor emphasis will be placed on assessment, diagnosis, goal-setting, and interventions in management of acute and chronic health problems. Application of primary care and case management will be demonstrated in a variety of settings in collaboration with other health care providers.
Prerequisites: NU685/NU685C
Co-requisite: NU690

NU 695 Graduate Project                                                         0 credit

Scholarly ability in the application of theoretical and research knowledge gained throughout the program are demonstrated by critical analysis of a clinical problem with recommendations for change. (Completed during last year of enrollment).

NU 696 Graduate Seminar II                                                  1 credit

This course is designed as a seminar to guide students through the completion of each component of their Masters of Science in Nursing (MSN) graduate project proposal. The purpose of the MSN graduate project is to provide students with an opportunity to plan and implement an evidence-based quality improvement project in settings with a focus on clinical practice, nursing leadership, or nursing education.
Prerequisite: NU596
Co-Requisite: NU540

NU 710 Advanced Theory                                                        3 credits

This course is designed to prepare students who will perform at the highest levels of nursing practice. Concepts from nursing science and other related disciplines will be synthesized to prepare the student for the highest-level of nursing practice. Nursing and other interdisciplinary theories will be analyzed. Additionally, the complexities of practice at the doctoral level will be discussed.

NU 720 Quality Outcomes for Organizations & Systems  3 credits

This course is designed to evaluate and improve processes of care and outcomes of care across organizations and systems. Current and past Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) models are explored, including facilitators and barriers, and advantages and disadvantages. A major focus is use of objective data to determine improvements that are needed and to evaluate success of change efforts. Students will apply CQI methods/approaches to improve patient outcomes, use tools to evaluate data and indicators, and apply the concept of the learning organization, all to assure quality outcomes and patient safety related to a potential DNP scholarly project.

NU 730 Clinical Prevention and Population Health     3 credits

This course is designed to examine the impact of epidemiology on clinical prevention and population health. Epidemiological research and trends will be analyzed and applied to various populations. Health disparities among populations will be explored.

NU 731 Epidemiology and Biostatistics                                  3 credits

This course focuses on epidemiological theories and principles and the statistical interpretation of the incidence, distribution and control of disease, which directly affects the health of populations. Emphasis is also placed on the interpretation of statistical data to support critical appraisal of research and selection of best evidence to support practice change. This course emphasizes identification, description, interpretation and application of clinical data to research and other evidence as a basis for nursing practice.
Prerequisites: None*
*For Allen College MSN Community/Public Health students only, NU530 Population Health is a prerequisite.

NU 741 Analytic Methods for Evidence-Based Practice I  3 credits

This course is designed to prepare DNP students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead evidence-based practice change in a variety of healthcare settings. Theories and frameworks to support the importance of leadership, interprofessional collaboration, and communication in evidence-based innovation will be examined. The roles of leaders, managers, care providers, patients, technology, financial constraints, and the organizational structure will be explored in relation to quality improvement initiatives to improve healthcare outcomes and patient safety. This course is the first DNP-level didactic course in support of the DNP Scholarly Project.

NU 742 Analytic Methods for Evidence-Based Practice II  3 credits

This course is designed to prepare the DNP student with the knowledge and skills to plan the implementation and evaluation components of an evidence-based practice initiative in a healthcare system. Quality improvement frameworks and theories will be examined and applied in planning for the practice change. The use of relevant data to substantiate the practice problem and evaluate expected outcomes will be highlighted, as will the application of financial principles in budget planning. Ethical considerations will be explored. This course is the second DNP-level didactic course in support of the DNP Scholarly Project.
Prerequisite: NU741

NU 743 Analytic Methods for Evidence-Based Practice III  1 credit

This course is designed to prepare the DNP student with the knowledge and skills to plan for completion and dissemination of an evidence-based practice initiative in a healthcare system. The course will focus on strategies to facilitate completion of the DNP Scholarly Project, as well as student dissemination of findings to constituencies of interest. Written and verbal communication skills will be emphasized. This course is the third and final DNP-level didactic course in support of the DNP Scholarly Project.
Prerequisite: NU742

NU 750 Leadership and Collaboration                               3 credits

This course is designed to prepare students to assume the leadership role in health care organizations. The roles of advocate, communicator, and team member will be used to improve outcomes in health organizations and communities. The ability to lead inter-professional teams and build professional partnerships will be analyzed.

NU 791 Clinical Scholarship Theory I                                  2 credits

This course is designed to facilitate student exploration of a practice problem. This course will focus on the process of finding current evidence relevant to the problem and linking the problem to the science and theory of nursing and related disciplines.

NU 800 DNP Clinical Scholarship Intensive  1 credit 100 contact hours

This course is designed to facilitate the planning, development, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of a scholarly project that demonstrates doctoral-level clinical scholarship. Students will apply systems-level knowledge and skills in completion of the scholarly project as a foundation for future practice scholarship. An emphasis will be placed on leadership, collaboration, and the evaluation of outcomes to guide practice.
Students must enroll in this course four times during the DNP plan of study, for a total of 4 credit hours.
Co-Requisites: Students must be enrolled and complete this course at least 4 times, concurrent with NU791 Clinical Scholarship Theory I, 851 Clinical Scholarship Theory II, 871 Clinical Scholarship Theory III, and 881 Clinical Scholarship Theory IV. Enrollment in this course will continue until the DNP scholarly project is successfully defended. Students are only allowed to be enrolled in one section of NU800 at a time.

NU 805 Educational Concepts for Advanced Nursing Practice  3 credits

This course focuses on preparing nurses with the knowledge and skills necessary to educate various audiences in a variety of settings. The course will emphasize foundational principles of teaching and learning, learner needs and characteristics, instructional strategies, curriculum development, and evaluation of learning outcomes. Current issues and trends in health care will be explored in relation to their impact on the education of consumers, families, nursing staff, and students.

NU 811 Financial Concepts for Systems Management  3 credits

In this course students will develop a working knowledge of foundational concepts of economics, business, reimbursement, and the impact of public and private financing as they apply to acute and ambulatory care settings. Problem-based activities will assist the student to understand processes for short-term and long-term (capital acquisition and strategic planning) budgeting, as well as the basics of financial operations management. Finally, students will learn to monitor and evaluate outcomes through data extrapolation and analysis. The emphasis of the course will be on the development of knowledge and skills necessary to promote and sustain the financial viability of healthcare systems and to plan for achieving cost-effective, quality healthcare outcomes.

NU 851 Clinical Scholarship Theory II                                2 credits

This course is designed to facilitate development of the DNP project identified in Clinical Scholarship I. Students will identify outcomes and apply theoretical basis to support the project development. The practice problem and identified outcomes will be evaluated using appropriate methods, scientific principles, and national benchmarks.
Prerequisite: NU 791

NU 871 Clinical Scholarship Theory III                              2 credits

This course is designed to facilitate implementation of the DNP project identified in Clinical Scholarship I and supported in Clinical Scholarship II. It is designed to engage students in an active leadership role while implementing the identified DNP project. Emphasis will be placed on the development of effective communication, negotiation, and consensus building skills. Data collection and data analysis processes will also be emphasized.
Prerequisite: NU 851

NU 891 Clinical Scholarship Theory IV                              2 credits

This course is designed to facilitate the processes of evaluation of the DNP project identified in Clinical Scholarship I, supported in Clinical Scholarship II, and implemented in Clinical Scholarship III. It is designed to engage students in the evaluation, translation, and dissemination of outcomes from their DNP project.
Prerequisite: NU 871

OT 501 Foundations of Occupational Therapy               4 credits

This course reviews the history of OT practice and explores the current use of philosophies, theories, models and frames of reference. Students are introduced to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and explore the profession’s tenets, ethics, and professional roles as applied to varied practice settings. Regional and global public health care needs are reviewed and students are educated on the application of therapeutic use of self and critical reasoning as applied to evidence-based, client/family-centered care for diverse populations. Students who are in good standing with all 1st semester coursework to date will be assigned a Level I Fieldwork experience later in the semester. This experience involves a 35-40 hour rotation, within a practice setting, focused on applying the knowledge and skills being learned in the 1st semester. Emphasis is placed on gaining a clear understanding of ethical practice and learning about the various disciplines and team roles. Students will analyze practice environments for application of OT practice as they are exposed to organizational management, direct care situations, and documentation processes.
Prerequisite: Admission into Allen College’s Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Program.

OT 502 Health & Wellness                                                       2 credits

This course focuses on a life span analysis of societal and public health principles of illness and wellness. Content includes a critical review of current evidence for assessing physiological, psychosocial, cognitive and behavioral concepts and health care trends and the implications for occupational engagement and OT practice. Global health care trends and public health needs are explored. Cultural influences of health, access to care, health care disparity, and the impact of illness are investigated.
Prerequisite: Admission into Allen College’s Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Program.

OT 503 Musculoskeletal Anatomy                                       3 credits

This course includes examination of the anatomical structures of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the musculoskeletal system of those regions of the body primarily addressed in OT practice. Virtual dissection of body systems and musculoskeletal reviews are analyzed.
Prerequisite: Admission into Allen College’s Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Program.

OT 504 Applied Kinesiology                                                    3 credits

This course includes a comprehensive study of human movement. An application of the biomechanical frame of reference to evaluate force, torque, range of motion, strength, endurance, sensation, and edema is included. Laboratory experiences include the analysis of movements and performances of functional tasks/occupations.
Prerequisite: Admission into Allen College’s Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Program.

OT 509 Patient Care Skills                                                       2 credits

This course engages the student in the development of professional behaviors, basic patient care skills, and initial competencies associated with OT practice. Students will have opportunities to learn skills for ethical and professional behavior; observation and assessment; development of rapport, client-centered care; and therapeutic use of self.
Prerequisite: Admission into Allen College’s Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Program.

OT 511 Psychosocial Foundations & OT Practice Applications  4 credits

This course focuses on the psychosocial foundation of OT practice and emphasizes the knowledge and skills necessary for application of psychosocial intervention across all arenas of care. Initial content will focus on reviewing mental health conditions and exploring the impact of mental health on individuals, cultures, and societies. Students will search for and analyze current evidence and have opportunities to apply theories, frameworks, and clinical reasoning skills in assessment and intervention. Emphasis will be placed on developing professional skills and competencies in assessment and intervention used in psychosocial practice. Students in good standing with all 2nd semester coursework to date will be assigned a 35-40 hour rotation within a practice setting focused on applying the psychosocial/neurological knowledge and skills. Students will analyze the impact of psychosocial health on occupational engagement and participation within various contexts. Cultural acceptance of mental health issues will be explored. Opportunities to expand current knowledge of organizational management, direct care situations, and documentation will be provided. Emphasis is again placed on analyzing practice environments for application of OT practice. This Level I experience is designed to enrich didactic coursework through directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the OT process.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 1st semester OT graduate courses.

OT 512 Neuroscience Foundations for OT Practice     3 credits

This course focuses on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, and the current neuroscience evidence, as it applies to occupational therapy assessment and intervention. Additional topics include, but are not limited to, neuroscience as it relates to sensory function, behavior, cognition, and motor control. Application of current neuro-rehabilitation models will also be included.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 1st semester OT graduate courses.

OT 513 Integrating Cultural & Global Perspectives     3 credits

This course critically examines the use of reasoning and decision-making in assessment and intervention, with varied cultures, across the life span. Opportunities to explore processes for addressing ethical and cultural issues, managing language barriers, and improving access to care will be provided. Demographic health care needs of various cultures will be analyzed and assessments and treatments will be reviewed for global application. Case based scenarios will be used to apply logical thinking models to effectively address complex health care needs.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 1st semester OT graduate courses.

OT 518 Research I: Practice Scholarship                           2 credits

This course is an introduction to graduate research. Learners examine the quality of evidence to guide OT practice decisions. The course includes the use of search engines and relevant resources. The scholarship process includes the critique of the quality of evidence related to the developing a research project.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 1st semester OT graduate courses.

OT 521 Contemporary Service Delivery & Community Outreach  3 credits

This course focuses on evaluating the evidence and designing programs for occupational therapy services in community and emerging practice settings. Content includes developing needs assessments, designing programs, identifying potential funding resources, and establishing benchmarks. Students will complete a needs assessment for an existing organization, design a program, and submit a proposal.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 2nd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 522 Assistive Technology & Design                               2 credits

This course focuses on the design and use of assistive technologies, adaptations, and environmental modifications to enhance performance, safety, and independence. Content includes opportunities for evaluating the evidence, fabrication, and adaptation. Personal environments, community environments, and practice settings are analyzed for accessibility, necessary modifications, and compliance with legal requirements.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 2nd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 523 OT Practice with Aging Populations                   4 credits

This course involves critical examination of current evidence regarding health care needs and interventions for older adults. Students will explore the continuum of current care services for the older adult population. Services include promotion of wellness and illness models of intervention, productive aging, leisure adaptations, and neuro cognition. Topics will cover wellness programs, services in adult day care centers, assistive living environments, long term care, home health, hospice, and community based programs. Ethics, legislation, liability, reimbursement, advocacy, and documentation using Medicare/Medicaid guidelines are included. Students will develop professional competencies in the assessments and interventions. Evidence based assessments and interventions for sensorimotor, behavioral, cognition, social, and older adult care are included. Students in good standing with all 3rd semester coursework to date will also be assigned to a Level I Fieldwork experience in a setting that addresses the needs of older adults. This experience will serve to enrich didactic coursework through directed observation and participation and allow for analysis of practice environments for application of OT practice.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 2nd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 528 Research II: Design & Methodologies                 2 credits

This course involves advanced exploration of a research topic. Learning experiences include a critical review of related evidence, research methods, instrumentation, study designs, and analysis of results as appropriate for the selected research. Tasks will include critical examination of qualitative and quantitative designs; and methods of analyses and their application in health care studies. Working with a research mentor, and within institutional IRB guidelines, the students will work in small groups to implement an approved research project.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 2nd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 601 OT Clinical Practice with Children & Adolescent Populations  4 credits

Course content includes opportunities for evidence-based assessment and intervention of children and youth (0-21 years). Content prepares the student for the application of critical reasoning within a variety of settings that offer services for this population. Experiences serve to synthesize the roles of occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants, and other health care providers in this arena. Topics include professional standards of practice, ethics, advocacy, outcomes assessment, ethics, liability, documentation, and reimbursement of services. Experiences also serve to critically analyze the influence of culture in the provision of care. Emphasis is placed development of professional competencies in the assessment and intervention. Evidence-based occupational therapy assessment and care for children and youth is synthesized in this course. Students in good standing with all 4th semester coursework to date will be assigned a Level I Fieldwork experience in a pediatric/school system setting, which serves to enrich the didactic coursework through directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the OT process. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing practice environments for application of OT practice within communities, schools, and practice settings for children and youth.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 3rd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 602 OT School System Practice                                      4 credits

This course involves review of evidence-based services and critical application of the role of the occupational therapist in a school-based setting. Emphasis is placed on understanding the roles of all team members, including the student, parents, guardians, counselors, and teachers. Regulatory guidelines, IEPs, equipment, transitional living needs, and accessibility issues are explored. Professional leadership, advocacy, ethics, supervision and the profession’s ability to enhance educational outcomes are included. Relevant OT models of practice appropriate for the population are synthesized. Coursework will focus on development of professional competencies in the assessment and intervention. Evidence-based occupational therapy assessment and care for children and youth is synthesized in this course. Students in good standing with all 4th semester coursework to date will be assigned a Level I Fieldwork experience in a pediatric/school system setting, which serves to enrich the didactic coursework through directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the OT process. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing practice environments for application of OT practice within communities, schools, and practice settings for children and youth.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 3rd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 603 Dynamic Practice & Emerging Healthcare Trends  2 credits

Course content covers professional development in the knowledge, values, and skills necessary for practice in upper extremity and hand rehabilitation, sensory integration, low vision, dysphagia, ergonomics, driving rehabilitation, vestibular rehabilitation, work, and consultation. Exploration of the current evidence for provision of these services and the role of the OT in private, community, industrial, and physician practice settings are included. The course emphasizes on-going life-long learning and competencies. The learner is challenged to analyze emerging practice trends and the importance of developing the needed knowledge, skills, and values to prepare for evolving global, national, and regional health care imperatives.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 3rd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 608 Research III: Application & Data Collection    2 credits

With the support of the research advisor, the course advances the development of the assigned research project and extends the learners’ comprehension of the profession’s focus on scholarship for practice. Students will employ chosen methods of analysis to examine data collected in their study.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 3rd semester OT graduate courses.

OT 611 OT Practice with Adult Populations                    4 credits

Content of this course focuses on OT’s role with adult clients in collaboratively determine the needs, evidence based assessments, goals, interventions, and discharge plans to address impairments, injuries, or illnesses. Students will apply models of practice and frames of reference in addressing orthopedic, cardiovascular/pulmonary, neurological, and general health care needs. The roles of an occupational therapist, OTA, and other health care providers will be discussed. Information concerning professional standards of practice, ethics, advocacy, outcomes assessment, ethics, liability, documentation, and reimbursement of services is synthesized. Students will have the opportunity to develop evidence-based, professional competencies in evaluation and intervention and analyze the influence of culture in care. Students in good standing with all 5th semester coursework to date will be assigned a fieldwork experience. This Level I experience will allow learners to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize the information and identify client needs, select the appropriate assessments, and establish client centered goals and interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of occupational therapist, occupational therapy assistant, and other health providers and documentation, reimbursement, ethics, and liability will be critically examined.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 4th semester OT graduate courses.

OT 612 OT Modalities & Modifications                              2 credits

This course involves the application of adjunctive methods to enhance occupational performance. Case-based application of physical agent modalities is included. Current knowledge regarding contraindications and safety procedures is reviewed. Prosthetic training and the design, fabrication, and care of orthotics are explored. Client education in the care and usage of orthoses and prostheses is included. Education concerning professional roles, documentation, reimbursement, safety, and liability is also provided.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 4th semester OT graduate courses.

OT 613 OT Practice Management & Leadership           3 credits

This course focuses on advocacy and leadership skills and encourages the student to develop a professional practice that includes a mission, vision, strategic and business plans, applicable policies and procedures, a job description, performance benchmarks and appraisal methods. Related interviews, supervision, leadership models, and appraisal methods are included. Trends in health care systems, management principles, promotion, marketing, liability, consultation, advocacy, and consulting roles are also explored. Development of a 5 year professional development plan including goals for advanced practice certifications and fieldwork education are developed. Ethical scenarios as potential practice liability issues are analyzed. Students will also critically analyze the professional entry competencies for practice, including certification and licensure responsibilities.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 4th semester OT graduate courses.

OT 618 Research IV: Analysis & Dissemination             2 credits

In this course students will complete the research project (a culminating experience) and deliver a professional presentation of the study. Students will also develop an article for future publication.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 4th semester OT graduate courses.

OT 630 Fieldwork II A                                                               10 credits

This Level II Fieldwork experience is provided to strengthen the didactic learning experiences of the curriculum. Students’ professional service delivery of client services under supervision is evaluated. Experiences are selected for the quality and compatibility with the institution’s curriculum design. Application of the didactic and Level I fieldwork knowledge, skills, and values are enhanced with client-centered services delivered with professional mentorship and role modeling. Opportunities for discussion and problem-solving (as needed) of fieldwork experiences (including such topics as supervision, evidence use in practice, ethics, methods, and professional roles) will be provided. Discussions may occur on campus or on-line as appropriate. Focus is on developing the necessary entry-level skills for practice.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 5th semester OT graduate courses.

OT 670 Fieldwork II B                                                              10 credits

This Level II Fieldwork experience is provided to strengthen the didactic learning experiences of the curriculum. Students’ professional service delivery of client services under supervision is evaluated. Experiences are selected for the quality and compatibility with the institution’s curriculum design. Application of the didactic and Level I fieldwork knowledge, skills, and values are enhanced with client-centered services with professional mentorship and role modeling. Opportunities for discussion and problem-solving (as needed) of fieldwork experiences (including such topics as supervision, evidence use in practice, ethics, methods, and professional roles) will be provided. Discussions may occur on campus or on-line as appropriate. Focus is on developing the necessary entry-level skills for practice.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 6th semester OT graduate courses.

PH 400 Introduction to Public Health                                3 credits

This course provides a basic introduction to public health concepts by examining the philosophy, history, organization, and different disciplines of public health. It will introduce students to a range of topics, issues and policies to help understand current public health systems, policies and practices. The contents of the course will include material on public health foundation courses such as epidemiology, biostatistics, health services, population health etc. along with emerging topics in public health.

PH 410 The American Health Care System                     3 credits

This course provides an overview of U.S. Healthcare system. Students will be taught about fragmented nature of the system. In addition, they will be exposed to ever changing nature of the healthcare system, mainly in response to concerns regarding access, quality and cost.

PH 420 Health Care in Diverse Communities                 3 credits

This course will introduce students to different communities; and will focus on their health status, and complexities of health service delivery to these populations. It will provide a deeper understanding of the health inequalities; and will address variables such as gender, age, race, lifestyle, culture, and social class and how they are related to health status and health service needs.

PH 430 Introduction to Epidemiology and Biostatistics  3 credits

This course introduces the basic concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics as applied to public health problems. It will introduce students to the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation, appropriate summaries and displays of data, and the use of classical statistical approaches to describe the health of populations. Various epidemiologic study designs for investigating associations between risk factors and disease outcomes will also be introduced, along with methods to compute basic descriptive statistics.

PH 440 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention      3 credits

Provides an introduction to the theory and application of health promotion principles. Personal and public health lifestyles, identification of risk factors and behavioral change strategies that promote positive health behaviors of individuals, groups, and communities are covered.

PH 450 Social Determinants of Health                              3 credits

This course focuses on the systematic study of the social and economic conditions under which people live that determine their health. It will explore how social influences such as income, living conditions, education, infrastructure, religious affiliation, health care, social capital, stress, gender, and race affect health and longevity. The course will also examine the role of public policy in shaping health outcomes for communities.

PH 460 Public Health Preparedness                                   3 credits

Introduces emergency management concepts as they apply to public health. Key elements of public health preparedness and response to the variety of natural, technological, and man-made disasters occurring routinely on a global basis.

PH 470 Environment and Public Health                            3 credits

Explores the relationship of people to their environment, environmental factors involved in transmission of communicable diseases and hazards due to exposure to chemical and physical materials in our environment. Topics include water quality, waste management, including hazardous waste; air quality and management; food protection; and other environmental topics.

PH 476 Introduction to Global Health                               3 credits

Focuses on current health policy issues within the context of the U.S. health care system and the political environment. Introduces major health care policy perspectives and their implications for public health. Includes an overview of ethical and legal standards and regulations affecting public health.

PH 480 Public Health Research and Evaluation            3 credits

On the examination and application of concepts, models and quantitative methods that facilitate the investigation of contemporary research in the field of Public Health.

PH 490 Ethics, Law and Health Care                                  3 credits

Explores interconnections among ethics, law and health care by examining classic legal-medical ethics cases, legal rules and ethical principles, access to health care and patients’ rights. Special attention will be given to ethical conflicts, as well as the roles of ethics consultants and ethics committees.

PH 495 Management, Law and Ethics                                3 credits

This course explores the management of a health care facility. It explores innovate approaches to payer models, law, and health care by examining classic legal-medical ethics cases, legal rules and ethical principles. Special attention will be given to ethical conflicts, as well as the roles of ethics consultants and ethics committees.

PH 499 Capstone Project                                                          3 credits

Designed for student to integrate, synthesize and apply knowledge from the entire curriculum. Options include a public health or health care internship; or development of an evidence-based project with a scholarly paper.

RA 100 Medical Terminology                                                  1 credit

This course studies the language related to medical science and health science specialties. Emphasis is on word analysis, construction, definitions, pronunciation, spelling and standard abbreviations.

RA 111 Radiographic Procedures I                                       2 credits

This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary theory, concepts, and hands-on experience in performing specific diagnostic procedures. Patient positioning, equipment manipulation, appropriate patient care techniques, and critique of radiographic images are presented in this course. Critical thinking skills are presented for utilization throughout the course. This course acquaints students with terminology used in the radiology department. This course will include an introduction to positioning, chest, and bones and joints. Includes lab experiences.
Pre/Co-requisites: Anatomy and Physiology I & Anatomy and Physiology II

RA 112 Methods of Patient Care and Assessment I     1 credit

This course is a study of the basic concepts of patient care and assessment during radiographic procedures. The course includes the study of medical ethics and legalities, infection control procedures utilizing universal precautions. Cultural diversity will be discussed as it relates to caring for the patient and family during radiographic procedures.
Pre/Co-requisites: Anatomy and Physiology I & Anatomy and Physiology II

RA 115 Introduction to Radiography                                  3 credits

This course provides students with an overview of radiology and its role in health care delivery, including, ethics, basic hospital procedures, , basic radiation protection as it pertains to the radiographer and the patient based on ALARA, and a historical perspective of radiology. Discussion includes radiation exposure and monitoring, units of measurement, dosimeters and NCRP recommendations. Students are introduced to the accrediting bodies and professional organizations in Radiologic Technology. This course includes an introduction to the x-ray tube, x-ray production, and digital radiographic image formation.
Prerequisites: Level I RA Summer Courses

RA 121 Radiographic Procedures II                                     5 credits

A continuation of Radiographic Procedures I designed to provide the student with the necessary theory, concepts, and hands-on experience in performing additional diagnostic radiographic procedures. Patient positioning, equipment manipulation, appropriate patient care techniques and critique of radiographic images are presented. Areas to be covered include abdomen/accessory organs, digestive system, upper extremity, shoulder girdle, lower extremities, hip and pelvis, urinary system, and critical thinking skills necessary to adapt to individual situations and procedures. The student will be introduced to examinations utilizing contrast media and includes lab experiences.
Prerequisites: Level 1 RA Summer Courses

RA 122 Methods of Patient Care and Assessment II    2 credits

This course is a study of the basic concepts of patient care and assessment during radiographic procedures. This course includes the study of tubes, catheters, medication administration, vital signs and emergency medicine, and patient care in specialty areas.
Prerequisites: Level 1 RA Fall Courses

RA 131 Radiographic Procedures III                                    5 credits

This course is a continuation of Radiographic Procedures I and II and is designed to provide the student with the necessary theory, concepts, and hands-on experience in performing additional diagnostic radiographic procedures. Patient positioning, equipment manipulation, appropriate patient care techniques and critique of radiographic images are presented in this course. Areas to be covered include pediatrics, bony thorax, vertebral column myelography studies, skull, facial bones, paranasal sinuses, trauma radiography, and introduction to special modalities, and critical thinking skills necessary to adapt to individual situations and procedures. Includes lab experience.
Prerequisites: Level 1 RA Fall Courses

RA 135 Professional Development Practicum I              3 credits

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their professional growth in the clinical areas, professional meetings, and college and community service. The student will be able to apply classroom theory to a wide variety of diagnostic radiographic procedures in the clinical setting. It provides students an opportunity to apply concepts in radiologic procedures, patient care, instrumentation, and an orientation to the various areas within a radiology department. Students acquire experience and competency in their radiologic technology skills, professional behavior, and critical thinking skills.
Prerequisites: Level I RA Summer Courses

RA 145 Professional Development Practicum II             4 credits

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their professional growth in the clinical areas, professional meetings, and college and community service. It provides students an opportunity to continue to develop and demonstrate an increased degree of proficiency with diagnostic radiographic procedures developed in Professional Development Practicum I. The students will observe in special imaging modalities as assigned. The student acquires competency and proficiency in a wide variety of procedures by applying classroom theory to the actual procedures in the clinical setting. Critical thinking skills and professional behavior will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: Level I RA Fall Courses

RA 154 Imaging Methods and Sectional Anatomy       2 credits

This course will introduce students to imaging modalities including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This course will also include detailed cross-sectional anatomy. This course is taught in the classroom and online.
Prerequisites: Level I RA Fall Courses

RA 203A Radiographic Outcomes                                        1 credit

This course is designed to allow students a continuous assessment, application and reflection process, which will enable students to independently challenge their learning and growth as a professional radiographer. The student is expected to demonstrate independent learning and self-evaluation.
Prerequisites: Level I RA Summer Courses

RA 203B Radiographic Outcomes                                         2 credits

This course is designed to allow students a continuous assessment, application and reflection process, which will enable students to independently challenge their learning and growth as a professional radiographer. The student is expected to demonstrate independent learning and self-evaluation.
Prerequisites: Level II RA Fall Courses

RA 251 Radiographic Physics and Imaging I                    3 credits

This course presents the student with the principles of radiation physics. Some of the concepts it includes are matter, energy, electrostatics, electrodynamics, magnetism, electromagnetism and electromagnetic induction. It also includes the study of the X-ray circuit, X-ray, X-ray production, and X-ray interactions with matter.
Prerequisites: Level II RA Summer Courses

RA 255 Professional Development Practicum III           6 credits

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their professional growth in the clinical areas, professional meetings, and college and community service. This clinical experience applies classroom theory to develop competencies and proficiency. The student will experience more clinical procedures and rotations. Students will demonstrate an increasing speed and efficiency in the performance of radiographic procedures.
Prerequisites: Level I RA Spring Courses

RA 258 Radiographic Pathology                                           2 credits

This course explores basic disease processes as to their radiographic significance. Causes, symptoms, and treatments of disease are discussed.
Prerequisites: Level II RA Summer Courses

RA 261 Radiation Protection                                                  2 credits

This course is the study of the biological effects of radiation on the patient. Methods of minimizing patient exposure, the early and late effects of radiation, protection of the patient and personnel, radiation quantities, and limits.
Prerequisites: Level II RA Fall Courses

RA 265 Professional Development Practicum IV           6 credits

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their professional growth in the clinical areas, professional meetings, and college and community service. It is designed to improve the student's proficiency in procedures presented in previous Practicum(s). The clinical experience presents the student an opportunity to perform their skills independently and to improve proficiency. Multi-skilling opportunities will be provided by experiences in MRI and CT.
Prerequisites: Level II RA Summer Courses

RA 270 Radiographic Physics and Imaging II                  3 credits

This course includes the study of radiographic image acquisition, processing and display. Topics include radiographic image quality and exposure technique factors, and application of technique formulas.
Prerequisites: Level II RA Fall Courses

RA 275 Professional Development Practicum V            5 credits

This course is designed to provide students opportunities to enhance their professional growth in the clinical areas, professional meetings, and college and community service. This clinical experience continues to present the student an opportunity to perform their skills more efficiently and independently. Students will observe and gain knowledge in cancer treatment procedures.
Prerequisites: Level II RA Fall Coursess

AC | DMS | EdD | MI | MLS | NU | OT | PH | RA